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Indigenous Education K-12

About this Guide

Boozhoo! Welcome!

The guide will help Education students locate a wide variety of resources for integrating First Nations, Metis and Inuit (FNMI) perspectives and experiences available through Lakehead University Libraries and online.  This guide will also assist in locating resources related to the history of Aboriginal Education, including residential schools.  

You may also wish to consult the Teacher Resource Guides listed below: 

New Titles

They Dance in the Sky: Native American Star Myths

For countless generations, Native American storytellers have watched the night sky and told tales of the stars and the constellations. The stars themselves tell many tales--of children who have danced away from home, of six brothers who rescue a maiden from the fearful Rolling Skull, of the great wounded sky bear, whose blood turns the autumn leaves red, and many more.

Surviving the City Vol 1

Miikwan and Dez are best friends. Miikwan is Anishinaabe; Dez is Inninew. Together, the teens navigate the challenges of growing up in an urban landscape - they're so close, they even completed their Berry Fast together. However, when Dez's grandmother becomes too sick, Dez is told she can't stay with her anymore. With the threat of a group home looming, Dez can't bring herself to go home and disappears. Miikwan is devastated, and the wound of her missing mother resurfaces. Will Dez's community find her before it's too late? Will Miikwan be able to cope if they don't?

Surviving the City Vol 2: From the Roots Up

Dez's grandmother has passed away. Grieving, and with nowhere else to go, she's living in a group home. On top of everything else, Dez is navigating a new relationship and coming into her identity as a Two-Spirit person.  Miikwan is crushing on the school's new kid Riel, but doesn't really understand what Dez is going through. Will she learn how to be a supportive ally to her best friend? Elder Geraldine is doing her best to be supportive, but she doesn't know how to respond when the gendered protocols she's grown up with that are being thrown into question. Will Dez be comfortable expressing her full identity? And will her community relearn the teachings and overcome prejudice to celebrate her for who she is?

Residential Schools (Indigenous Life in Canada: Past, Present and Future Series)

"Discusses the history of residential schools, including why the government established them, how Indigenous children were treated, and the lasting impact on Indigenous cultures and traditions."-- Provided by publisher.

Stewardship (Indigenous Life in Canada: Past, Present and Future Series)

"Indigenous peoples have played an influential role in Canadian history and continue to do so today. From the past and into the future, Stewardship reveals the role of Indigenous peoples in taking care of the land and using it responsibly."-- Provided by publisher.

Sixties Scoop (Indigenous Life in Canada: Past, Present, Future Series)

"Discusses the removal on Indigenous children from their families, the reasons behind their removal, their lives in foster care, and the feeling of loss felt by many adoptees as a result of being raised in a non-Indigenous family."-- Provided by publisher.

Just Lucky

Lucky loves her grandparents, and they are all the family she really has. True, her grandma forgets things...like turning off the stove, or Lucky's name. But her grandpa takes such good care of them that Lucky doesn't realize how bad things are. That is until he's gone. When her grandma accidentally sets the kitchen on fire, Lucky can't hide what's happening any longer, and she is sent into foster care. She quickly learns that some foster families are okay. Some aren't. And some really, really aren't. Is it possible to find a home again when the only one you've ever known has been taken from you?

I Can Make This Promise

In her debut middle grade novel--inspired by her family's history--Christine Day tells the story of a girl who uncovers her family's secrets--and finds her own Native American identity. All her life, Edie has known that her mom was adopted by a white couple. So, no matter how curious she might be about her Native American heritage, Edie is sure her family doesn't have any answers. Until the day when she and her friends discover a box hidden in the attic--a box full of letters signed "Love, Edith," and photos of a woman who looks just like her. Suddenly, Edie has a flurry of new questions about this woman who shares her name. Could she belong to the Native family that Edie never knew about? But if her mom and dad have kept this secret from her all her life, how can she trust them to tell her the truth now?

Sus Yoo / the Bear's Medicine

A mother bear shares with her cubs how to be grateful for all they have in the natural world. The Bear's Medicineshows the interconnectedness of all things in the world they live in and how each season brings changes and blessings for the bears. It is a story of a mother's love for her children as she teaches them how to survive. Written in English and Dakelh.

Being (Me)tis

A tale about identity, community, and blood memory, Being (Mé)tis, is a young woman's story of growing up without knowledge of her heritage. Although she feels like she is alone in her struggle, the young woman slowly realizes that community is more than just the people who live around you.

The Train

Ashley meets her great-uncle by the old train tracks near their community in Nova Scotia. Ashley sees his sadness, and Uncle tells her of the day years ago when he and the other children from their community were told to board the train before being taken to residential school where their lives were changed forever. They weren't allowed to speak Mi'gmaq and were punished if they did. There was no one to give them love and hugs and comfort. Uncle also tells Ashley how happy she and her sister make him. They are what give him hope. Ashley promises to wait with her uncle by the train tracks, in remembrance of what was lost.

Little Wolf

"A young Indigenous girl moves to the big city and learns to find connections to her culture and the land wherever she goes, despite encountering bullies and feelings of isolation along the way. When Little Wolf moves to the big city with her mom and sister, she has difficulty adjusting to their new life. She misses living close to nature and seeing animals wherever she goes, and she misses fishing with her grandfather and seeing dolphins leaping beside their boat. Most of all, she misses feeling connected to her culture. At school, Little Wolf has trouble fitting in. Although her class has kids from many different cultures, no one is Heiltsuk, like her. The other kids call her names and make her feel unwelcome. Her only defence is to howl like a wolf so they run away. But this only isolates her further. Gradually, Little Wolf starts to see the beauty in her new surroundings. She discovers that there is wildlife everywhere, even in the big city. An otter swims beside her as she walks on the seawall. A chickadee chirps in a tree in the big park near her house. And her mother helps her stay connected to their culture by signing them up for beading and dance classes. Despite the difficult start, Little Wolf grows up proud of her background and ready to face the future. This inspiring tale, the first in a trilogy, combines traditional and contemporary Indigenous themes and artwork."-- Provided by publisher.

Wahogicobi: Kinship Terms to make relationship with each other

Our Aboriginal Elders tell of a time when animals and humans could speak to each other. When humans became too greedy and killed more animals than they needed for food, the Creator changed that relationship to protect the animals. So the Creator made a Spirit Animal to represent each one and granted them gifts they could give to people. Spirit Animals teach, heal and inspire. Turtle carries North America on its back and symbolizes peace and balance. Bear is called "Grandfather" for its strength, leadership, confidence and courage. Coyote gifted us with fire and knowledge of herbs and food. Wolf taught us to hunt and form communities. This book is a guide, and the meanings of the Spirit Animals featured here are only one interpretation. If you see these Spirit Animals or Totems reflected in your own life, you have received their gift.

Educational Organizations

New Indigenous Ebooks/Teaching Resources